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What is KSP?
To ensure sustainable economic growth and inclusive development one needs good systems and policies. In order to achieve this, knowledge on economic development policies and systems should be shared among all states for its joint growth. The Knowledge Sharing Program (KSP), noted as one of the top 10 national branding businesses, is a Korea-led comprehensive customized policy consulting that provides research, advice and education & training (capacity building) on the national policy, law and institution of our partner countries based on their demands and conditions. KSP as an economic cooperation program ultimately seeks to contribute to the sustainable socio-economic development of our partner countries and the common prosperity and stability of the globe through these activities.
What are the components of KSP?
KSP is composed of 1) Bilateral Policy Consultation – collaborative research and consulting between Korea and its partner countries, 2) Joint Consulting with International Organizations – a trilateral consulting program co-operated with international organizations, and 3) Systemization & Modularization - organizing the Korean development experience into case studies.
Among KSP programs, what is Joint Consulting with International Organizations?
KSP Joint Consulting with International Organizations(IOs) jointly consults partner countries together with IOs based on Korea’s economic development experience. KSP Joint Consulting grew from the original KSP National Policy Consulting Program as a bilateral cooperation structure into a trilateral cooperation structure in 2011. Currently the program is conducted in partnership with IOs such as World Bank, Asia Development Bank, UN and others. It has been appraised as having proposed a “Win-Win-Win knowledge sharing model” that benefits all players (Korea-International Organizations-Partner Country). Moreover, Korea has been able to publicize the KSP and establish the basis for entering IOs’ consulting procurement market. Currently in 2015, the Korea EXIM Bank heads the Korean network.
Among the KSP programs, what is Modularization?
KSP Modularization began from self-examining the Korean development experience that was not systematically organized before. It is to serve as the basis for running the KSP policy consultation program. Accordingly, KDI launched The ‘Development Experience Modularization’ in 2007 under the project title, ‘Development Experience Systemization.’ It aims to transfer Korean development knowledge and experiences into tangible case studies which can be directly utilized in programs such as KSP. KDI completed 21 systemization from 2007 to 2009, and KDI School took over the project, thus naming the project the ‘Development Experience Modularization’ in 2010, The Modularization is to carry out Korea’s development experience which documents policies, their implementation and outcomes, institution building process, and public projects that had greatly contributed to Korea’s economic development. It has completed 100 cases in total until 2012.
What is unique about KSP (Bilateral Policy Consultation)?
KSP has 3 unique features. First, KSP is a demand-driven program. KSP selects and propels its consultation areas according to the demands and requests from its partner countries. In this regard, KSP is a participatory program. To enhance a strong sense of ownership from the partner countries, we set the policy areas in line with their demands while local consultants from the partnering country co-research and consult with the Korean experts. Secondly, KSP is a policy-oriented program. KSP strives to provide detailed and practical policy advice on the requested subjects to achieve the development targets of our partner countries. From a long term perspective, this principle would support the sustainable economic growth of the partner countries. Lastly, KSP is a comprehensive economic cooperation program. In addition to joint research and policy consultation on related areas, KDI tries to maximize the learning effect and establish a mid-and-long-term cooperative relationship by inviting local policy personnel and experts to Korea to discuss recommendations and visit relevant ministries and institutions.
With which countries does KSP work with?
KSP has conducted joint research and policy consultation on approximately 440 themes with 123 countries (accumulated, 48 in total) in the nearby region of Southeast Asia, South Asia & Northeast Asia (12 countries) as well as Latin America and Caribbean (14 countries), Sub-Saharan Africa (9 countries), Middle East and North Africa (6 countries) and Europe & Central Asia (7 country). KSP is a new paradigm of economic cooperation that partners with various countries such as Saudi Arabia, UAE, Oman, Kuwait whose GDP per capita is close to that of advanced countries, South Africa, Indonesia, Romania, members of the G20, OECD members such as Turkey, Mexico, bRICs member, Brazil as well, as ODA recipient countries.
KSP is divided into ‘Development Partner Country’ and ‘Strategic Development Partner Country’. How are they different?
In order to apply and implement the policy advice effectively, it must be accompanied by institutional improvements and the capacity development of those in charge. Recognizing the limits of the original KSP policy consultations, KDI implemented the ‘Strategic Development Partner Country’ in 2009 to provide specific Action Plans on implementing the policies suggested through KSP. In addition, it offers inclusive, comprehensive, and customized consulting on constructing necessary backbones of an economy such as legal frameworks, related organizations, and training programs for talented individuals to support the Action Plan. Unlike ‘Development Partner Countries,’ the Strategic Development Partner Countries are consulted for 3 years and the areas and numbers of studies are wider and deeper. KDI cooperates with the Korea EXIM bank that heads the overseas economic cooperation fund (EDCF, credit assistance fund) and KOICA that heads grant-in-aids to contribute to the socio-economic development of our partner countries.
How do you select KSP partner countries?
KSP partner country selection begins in the second quarter of the previous year. First, KDI reviews the KSP index in choosing the provisional countries. The KSP index consists of 1) quantitative indices which reflect the economic level, education, population, resource and others indicators of growth potential and 2)qualitative indicators such as the potential country’s cooperation will, continuity of the program and geopolitical importance. Provisional countries must send written demand identification surveys through the official diplomatic channel. Final partner countries are selected based on the constancy of survey response content, strategic importance and other criteria.
What are the accomplishments of KSP so far?
The KSP Policy Consultation has conducted joint research and policy consulting on approximately 441 specific areas for 48 countries between 2004 and 2012. This program has helped to establish economic development plans for partner countries as well as to enable a more systemic policy implementation such as establishing legal frameworks and relevant institutions. Moreover, because KSP policy consultation is based on the requests of those countries that view Korea as a development model, it contributes to building a friendly image of korea and also a horizontal and inclusive bilateral cooperative partnership through discussions with the partner country’s President, Minister‧Vice-Minister and other high level officials. Major achievements are as follows:

- Vietnam, first selected as the strategic development partner country in 2009, underwent an inclusive consultation of the entire economy which led to the establishment of the “2011~2020 Social Economic Development Strategy”*. Similar cases include Kuwait’s “5-year Development Plan” and Kazakhstan’s “2010~2014 Industrial Innovation Development Plan” and more.
* KSP received a Letter of Appreciation from the Minister of Planning and Investment of Vietnam regarding the above strategy (2011)

- Countries such as Cambodia and Mongolia* are in the process of organizing relevant legislations for the “Implementation of PPP” after policy consultations on private investment promotion. Indonesia and Cambodia are planning to create an “institution for bond pricing” and a “trade promotion organization” respectively. Furthermore, the Dominican Republic** is on track to build a “Committee for Export•Investment Promotion” and an “Export-Import Bank”.
* KSP was presented the “Mongolian Ministry of Finance 100 years Anniversary Medal of Appreciation” by the Minister of Finance, Mongolia (2012)
** KSP was presented the “National Economic Development Medal of Service” from the President of the Dominican Republic (2011)

- To support the “Comprehensive Trade Center Establishment Project” in the Dominican Republic, it is planned by cooperating with the EDCF. Also, one huge outcome is that DR Congo is planning to implement one of the recommendations from the KSP consultation to their national development strategy by utilizing the KOICA program the following year.

- Korean firms are offered the chance to participate in various follow-up projects. Such include the Vietnam PPP project (Hanoi-Hai Phong highway) and the construction of the Dominican distribution line where Korea Electric Power Corporation has won the contract.

- Lastly, Saudi Arabia is building a Saudi Arabia Development Institution (SDI), an educational broadcasting system (EBS) and e-learning system following the first year of KSP policy consultations. Following the strong request from Saudi Arabia, the KDI research team and KDI School are respectively working on the policy servicing for “implementation towards a knowledge economy” and the Saudi National Technical and Vocational Training Center (TVTC) capacity Development program.
What is different among KSP, KOICA and ODA?
KSP is a new form of knowledge-intensive economic cooperation program different from the features and characteristics from the traditional ODA. KSP partners not only with ODA recipients but also with non-ODA recipients such as a BRICs country and donor, Brazil, OECD members, Turkey and Mexico, G20 members, South Africa and Indonesia, and resource rich countries, Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and UAE. KSP does not provide material support and requires non-ODA receiving partner countries to share some of the KSP operational costs.
These clearly differentiate KSP from the traditional ODA. In some cases ODA-recipient partner countries volunteer to share the cost in order to participate in KSP, thus, this prospective is respected and reflected to the upmost. Especially, unlike grant projects that focus on practical and active grassroots cooperation projects, KSP focuses on finding socio-economic policy alternatives and building laws and regulations as well as sharing these outcomes.
What is YKSP?
Young KSP (YKSP) is a newly founded program that began in 2012 which provides talented Korean youth the opportunity to participate in KSP and to grow as international cooperation professionals. Through the YKSP system YKSPians take active part in various stages of KSP to see how Korea’s development experience and knowledge are studied and shared with partner countries and witness the transformation of partner countries upfront. KDI provides live learning-experiences on KSP policy consultation, the international development cooperation, and the Korean economic development experience through separate orientation programs and opportunities to partake in international development cooperation forums. Also, to vitalize knowledge sharing between YKSPians, KDI holds regular meetings and the YKSP evaluation seminar and runs the YKSP blog. Once the year round program ends, YKSPians are required to write activity diaries on what they have learned and experienced. Outstanding diaries are planned to be published. With these experiences, the YKSPians would acquire various field-knowledge, capacity and a global sense of nation-to-nation knowledge sharing and become true global leaders. In addition, the Center for International Development at KDI (CID@KDI) will do the best in developing and expediting the KSP through the continuous communication with the YKSPians.
How is KSP processed?
The KSP procedure can be divided into ‘Development Partner Country’ and ‘Strategic Development Partner Country’. As shown in the graph* the ‘Strategic Development Partner Country’ consists of 7 steps while ‘Development Partner Country’ consists of 6, excluding the policy demand seminar.



Program Implementation

KSP Policy Consultation for
Development Partner Country -
1 year Project

  1. 1. Demand Identification & Pilot Study

    Provisional research topics are selected based on the country’s demand identification surveys. Identification of policy priorities is carried out.

  2. 2. Additional Pilot Study

    Korea delegation would visit and exchange ideas with KSP counterparts* in case there is a need for an additional field study.

  3. 3. Interim Reporting & Workshop

    Interim reports are shared with KSP counterparts and collect feedbacks on the suggested policy recommendations. KSP counterparts visit Korea’s organizations relevant to research topics in order to enhance practical knowledge and skills.

  4. 4. Capacity Building Workshop

    KSP counterparts are provided with a training program comprising of techniques, know-how, and management skills that would help implement the policy recommendations.

  5. 5. Final Reporting & Senior Policy Dialogue

    Senior Policy Dialogue is carried out to enhance KSP counterparts’ understanding and adoption of the recommended policy. KSP counterparts are provided with the first draft of the final report for review and discussion at the Final Reporting.

  6. 6. Dissemination Seminar & Program Evaluation

    KSP counterparts are invited to Korea for sharing research outcomes and main policy points of the KSP conducted hroughout a year. Final reports are distributed. Survey and interviews are conducted for monitoring and evaluation.

KSP Policy Consultation for Strategic
Development Partner Country -
3 year Project

  1. 1. Demand Identification & Pilot Study

    Provisional research topics are selected based on the country’s demand identification surveys. Identification of policy priorities is carried out.

  2. 2. Policy Demand Seminar

    KSP counterparts give presentation to generate in-depth understanding of the identified KSP topics. KSP counterparts visit associated organizations to seek ownership and inspiration of KSP.

  3. 3. Additional Pilot Study

    Korea delegation would visit and exchange ideas with KSP counterparts* in case there is a need for an additional field study.

  4. 4. Interim Reporting & Workshop

    Interim reports are shared with KSP counterparts and collect feedbacks on the suggested policy recommendations. KSP counterparts visit Korea’s organizations relevant to research topics in order to enhance practical knowledge and skills.

  5. 5. Capacity Building Workshop

    KSP counterparts are provided with a training program comprising of techniques, know-how, and management skills that would help implement the policy recommendations.

  6. 6. Final Reporting & Senior Policy Dialogue

    Senior Policy Dialogue is carried out to enhance KSP counterparts’ understanding and adoption of the recommended policy. KSP counterparts are provided with the first draft of the final report for review and discussion at the Final Reporting.

  7. 7. Dissemination Seminar & Program Evaluation

    KSP counterparts are invited to Korea for sharing research outcomes and main policy points of the KSP conducted hroughout a year. Final reports are distributed. Survey and interviews are conducted for monitoring and evaluation.

*KSP counterparts may include top policy-makers, government officials, diplomats, experts, researchers of partner countries.

1) Project Planning (Jan. ~ Apr.): Based on the country-demand identification survey, provisional research areas are selected and the Korean consulting team (senior advisor, project manager, research crew) is formed. Prior to visiting the partner country KDI requests survey responses, recommendations for local consultants holds the Korean expert meeting and takes other necessary pre-measures.
2) High-level Demand Identification and Pilot Study (April ~ May, 1 week, field study): Undertaking discussions with local high-level decision makers and practitioners, KDI explains the purpose of KSP, agrees on detailed policy demands, explores the current status of partner countries and finally decides on the specific areas of research. Afterwards, the Korean Ministry of Strategy and Finance and KDI select local partner institutions and agree on an MOU in addition to contacting and contracting with local consultants.
3) <Exclusive to strategic development partner countries> Seminar on Policy Demands (May ~ June, in Korea): KDI brings high-level policy decision makers and local consultants to Korea to present and discuss the pending issues in their country and also to visit relevant ministries and institutions.
4) < Exclusive to strategic development partner countries> Additional Pilot Study and Local Reporting (July ~ Sep., 1 week, field visit): Additional research is taken on the provisional research result for each policy consultation area. The team also exchanges opinions with the policy decision makers and experts of the partner countries
5) Interim Reporting and Policy Practitioners’ Workshop (Oct. ~ Nov., in Korea): KDI invites policy practitioners and local consultants to come to Korea and collect opinions on the tentative recommendation. Capacity Development Workshop for policy practitioners is also included.
6) Final Reporting Workshop and Senior Policy Dialogue (Dec. ~ Jan., field visit): The Final Reporting Workshop is held in the partner country. The dialogue is based on the draft final report (English) while the major outlines of the policy advice are delivered to high-level policy personnel separately. Comments from the Final Reporting Workshop and Senior Policy Dialogue plus remarks from anonymous reviewers are reflected in the final report. If the program is planned for the following year we visit relevant local institutions for prearrangement meetings on research topics.
7) Dissemination Seminar and Project Evaluation (post-February): We share research results with other agencies and experts and distribute the final report. We also undergo an end evaluation and impact assessment of the outcomes and process.
8) Interim Review Session (Korea): Consisting of 3 sessions in total the first review session is held after the demand identification and pilot study stage. The second and third sessions are held before the Interim Reporting Workshop and Final Reporting Workshop respectively. The first session seeks to check whether the partner country’s demands have been fully reflected. The second and third brings people from relevant ministries and experts from outside the center to review preparations for the Reporting Seminar and the report that the consulting team has submitted.
What topics does KSP research?
Topics for KSP are decided entirely based on the partner country’s demands and requests. KSP topics are comprehensive covering areas of economy, social science, science & technology and more. More detailed subjects include areas of the economy such as establishing macroeconomic development plan, industrial policy and investment disposition, trade‧export promotion, SME promotion, public enterprise reform, financial policy in addition to ICT, science and technology innovation, agricultural processing, education, capacity development, green growth, renewable energy, e-government, e-procurement system and various others.
Why should we help people abroad while there are poor people in need in Korea?
Korea once received substantial volume of aid from many countries during the past decades of economic recovery. The total amount of aid since the post-war era reaches $12.7 billion. Even without considering the weighted value, it amounts to around ₩14 trillion. It is undeniable that this development aid was the foundation of Korea’s remarkable economic growth. Based on this fact, it is time for Korea to return to other countries as much as we have received as a member of the international society.

Moreover, the increase in interconnectedness between states due to globalization is another reason why Korea should actively share with others. For example, a security threat caused by the poverty of one country can result in threats such as pirating. It is easy to imagine the damage of security threats by looking at the case of Captain Seok Hae-Gyun and his vessel Samho Jewelry attacked by Somali pirates. Therefore, we must recognize each state’s economic development as a global public good for common prosperity and peace and must approach international cooperation as an investment to protect global peace.

Finally KSP is an economic cooperation program. Economic cooperation is not a program that unilaterally aids its partner countries but aims to share mutual benefits. KSP not only increases Korea’s national status by enabling partner countries to naturally become accustomed to Korea’s technology or contents but also connects Korean companies to the implementing stages. This benefits Korea’s national interests in the mid-long term. However, the real purpose of KSP is the sustainable development of partner countries and common prosperity and not the direct or indirect interests of Korea.
Do advanced countries or international organizations have similar programs?
The international society already recognizes the importance of knowledge management and knowledge sharing. Not only government agencies such as DFID (UK), JICA (Japan), GIZ (Germany), CIDA (Canada) and the European Commission but also international organizations such as the World Bank, OECD and the UN have differing projects for knowledge sharing and network establishment. In the case of World Bank, they have developed the South-South Experience Exchange Program (SEETF) and are trying to connect developing countries that need real knowledge and financial aid with emerging countries that have similar experiences to provide them both with a learning opportunity as opposed to a one-way knowledge delivery. Moreover, OECD has created a knowledge sharing platform called the ‘Knowledge sharing Alliance (KSA) where members such as Korea provide policy support and plan to use it as a mutual learning tool. In 2011, World Bank compared the performance of KSP and SEETF and noted that KSP is the most innovative and progressive knowledge sharing program while the OECD has chosen Korea and Germany as its main partnering countries for KSA. The Korean KSP is making its place as a leader of international knowledge cooperation as AfDB, ADB and others are trying to learn the different qualities of KSP. The Center for International Development at KDI (CID@KDI) will continue to develop KSP to contribute to the common prosperity and stability of the international society.

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